Healthy Lemon Cornstarch Pudding

Oh man, guys, it has been one heck of a week! Last Wednesday we closed on my first home, started painting our faces off, moved, and it’s been a whirlwind ever since. I haven’t had much time for cooking, but I am excited to get started again. I just might have to change my blog heading, because “adventures in a tiny kitchen” doesn’t really fit anymore—my kitchen is so much bigger and nicer! Can’t wait to put it through its paces.

I made this a few weeks ago, and absolutely loved it. As I mentioned a long time ago, chocolate cornstarch pudding is one of my family’s secret recipes, a summer go-to for me when I’m craving something cold and a little sweet.  I particularly love that recipe because it doesn’t require any kind of gelatin or anything like that, just simple cornstarch. But a while back I got to thinking about it and how, in theory, that recipe could be adapted a million different ways.

lemon cornstarch pudding finished2

I’m sure it’s no surprise that lemon was the first flavor that came to mind. Adapting it was incredibly simple, just leaving out the cocoa powder and adding fresh lemon zest, juice, and a little lemon extract to make it extra…lemon-y.

lemon cornstarch pudding lemons

The resulting flavor was so fresh and sweet and tart, I wanted to make gallons of it. As it was, I devoured it in a few sittings! Now I want to try orange, lime, all the flavors!

lemon cornstarch pudding milk

Pour 7 cups of the milk in a large saucepan and turn the heat on medium to medium-high (it was about 6 or 7 on my stove). You don’t want to heat it up too quickly. Let it heat slowly until the milk starts to steam a little, even a tiny simmer. This will probably take 10 minutes or so.

lemon cornstarch pudding lemon zest sugar

While the milk is heating, pour the remaining 1 cup of milk, the cornstarch, sugar, lemon zest, and squeeze the lemon juice (sans seeds!) into a blender and blend for a few seconds. Add a little lemon extract for a little something extra.

lemon cornstarch pudding thickening

Once the milk is steaming, slowly pour the milk/cornstarch mixture in while stirring.

lemon cornstarch pudding stirring

Turn down to more like medium-low or medium (about 4 or 5 on my stove) and continue to stir as the mixture thickens. This will take 10-15 minutes. The stirring is important because it’s going to try to stick to the bottom and you need to keep scraping that off.

lemon cornstarch pudding vanilla

Once it’s thickened, remove from the heat and add the vanilla, stir it in.

lemon cornstarch pudding finished

Let it sit and cool a little before serving. For me, I want it nice and cold, so I stick it in the fridge—and dip up a big bowl to eat as soon as possible that I stick in the freezer to cool off! It will keep for a few days in the fridge, but it will begin to separate after day three or so (particularly if you used skim milk). Doesn’t mean it’s bad, just that it’s less pudding-y.

lemon cornstarch pudding finished3

lemon cornstarch pudding finished4

It was so good! I can’t believe we haven’t thought about different variations before now, but now I’m brainstorming all the different types of pudding I can make!

Lemon Cornstarch Pudding

  • 8 cups of milk (I use skim)
  • 1 cup of sugar (I go scant on the sugar, more like 3/4 cup)
  • 3/4 c. cornstarch
  • Zest and juice of one lemon
  • A little lemon extract (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla

In a large saucepan on medium to medium-high (6 or 7 on my stove), pour 7 cups of the milk and slowly heat it up until it starts to steam a little (probably about 10 minutes). Err on the side of lower, because you don’t want to heat it up too quickly and scald the milk. While the milk is heating, pour the remaining 1 cup of milk, the cornstarch, sugar, lemon zest, and squeeze the lemon juice (sans seeds!) into a blender and blend for a few seconds. Add a little lemon extract for a little something extra.

Once the milk is steaming, slowly pour the milk/cornstarch mixture in while stirring. Turn the heat down to more like medium-low or medium (about 4 or 5 on my stove) and continue to stir as the mixture thickens. This will take 10-15 minutes. The stirring is super important because it’s going to try to stick to the bottom and you need to keep scraping that off.

Once it’s thickened, remove from the heat and add the vanilla, stir it in. Let it sit and cool a little before serving. My mom likes her pudding hot, but I think that’s weird, so I stick it in the fridge to get it nice and cold.

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Comments

  1. Wow this looks amazing and so simple! How much does this make? I just cook for myself and I’m sure this would make far too much pudding to eat by myself! Do you think it would scale down ok?

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    • Thanks! I’m also cooking for just myself, so I totally hear you on the amounts, it does make a lot of pudding (though I always end up eating it). I haven’t actually tried it, but have thought about scaling it back—mostly because I don’t always have 8 cups of milk on hand. I think you could halve it by cutting all the ingredient amounts in half, except I’d keep the same amount of lemon zest and lemon juice. Make sure to use a smaller pan, because half the liquid on the same amount of surface area will make it harder to keep the milk from scalding or the pudding from sticking. The recipe is super flexible, so I don’t know why that wouldn’t work just fine. Let me know how it turns out!

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Trackbacks

  1. […] starving hyenas, totally stuffing ourselves, then finished off our evening with creamy, refreshing lemon cornstarch pudding and some wine. All-in-all, a successful Father’s […]

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