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Amish Country Bread

It’s that time of the year when I’m trying to use up all my yeast, baking powder, and baking soda before Passover so I don’t have to throw much out. I hate waste. So I’m officially back on my bread-baking kick. I started last weekend with this delicious, soft, salty bread.

amish bread finished

This recipe was super easy to throw together, even though I had some trouble with the texture of the dough. Mine was much drier than I think it should have been (maybe weather-related too?). However, it didn’t seem to make any difference—the bread baked up soft and chewy, with a nice crisp crust on the outside.

amish bread finished2

I used my handy-dandy enameled cast-iron dutch oven, and the lid makes an awesome seal that traps the moisture in, which gives you that crusty outside and chewy inside. If you don’t have a dutch oven, you can bake on a castiron griddle (or pizza stone or some other oven-safe contraption), with some ice water in a separate pan to create steam.

amish bread yeast

Pull out your trusty old stand mixer and put all the ingredients EXCEPT the flour into the bowl. That means hot water, sugar, melted butter, yeast, and salt—get in there! Let it sit for 5-10 minutes, until the yeast does its bubbling thing.

amish bread flour

Add the flour in small batches & mix with a dough hook for several minutes.

amish bread dough

Grease a large bowl with butter or oil (I favor butter) and place the dough in it. Cover with a clean tea towel and let the dough rise until it doubles in size. This takes about 30 minutes. I heated the microwave for a minute or two and put the bowl in there afterward to rise in a nice warm place since my apartment is ridiculously frigid lately.

amish bread dough risen

This is about what it should look like. My dough seemed quite dry for some reason, but it still tasted delicious.

amish bread dough kneaded shaped

Punch down the dough and form it into a round loaf. Place on a greased cookie sheet or one covered in parchment paper. I actually used a castiron griddle, which gives it a nice crisp bottom.

amish bread dough crisscrossed

Slice decorative slits on top and let the dough rise again for a half hour or so while the oven heats up.

amish bread dough egg wash toppings

Brush an egg white wash (1 egg white + 1 tablespoon of water) over the top and sprinkle with kosher salt and a little Parmesan.

amish bread finished3

Bake at 400 F degrees for about 20 minutes (for me it took about 25 minutes). Fresh, hot bread for the eatin’!

Amish Country Bread

  • 4 tablespoons of sugar
  • 2 tablespoons of butter (melted)
  • 3 teaspoons of salt
  • 1 1/2 cups of hot water
  • 2 tablespoons of rapid rise yeast
  • 5 cups of flour (+ or -)

Put all ingredients but the flour—hot water, sugar, butter, yeast, and salt—into a large stand mixer. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, until the yeast does its bubbling thing. Add the flour in small batches & mix with a dough hook for several minutes. Grease a bowl with butter or oil and place the dough in it. Cover with a clean tea towel and let dough rise until doubled in size (about 30 minutes).

Punch down the dough and form it into a round loaf. Place on a greased cookie sheet or one covered in parchment paper. Slice decorative slits on top and let the dough rise again for a half hour or so while the oven heats up. Brush an egg white wash (1 egg white + 1 tablespoon of water) over the top and sprinkle with kosher salt and a little Parmesan. Bake at 400 F degrees for 17-20 minutes (for me it took about 25 minutes).

Original recipe here

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Comments

  1. Is that my delicious chicken quinoa in the background??

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  2. I just made this bread and it was fantastic! The only problem that I ran across was that the inside was still doughy when the top was rather browned. I did end up letting it rise for over two hours the second rise (because I had to go run errands), so maybe it just got too big to cook evenly at that temperature? By the way, I could only get 4.5 cups of flour to mix in. Two of them were bread flour, and the other 2.5 were whole wheat.

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    • Yeah, I had some issues with getting all the flour in there, and it was drier than I expect dough to be. Mine was a little doughy inside, but I kind of like mine that way so it didn’t bother me.

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      • Vince and I don’t mind *some* doughy-ness, (doughiness?) on the inside, but I think I’ll try baking it at 350 next time and see if it bakes up a bit more evenly. Still, terrific bread.

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